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PART IV: Work

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31 Interprofessional work THREE Interprofessional work Before examining the evidence for the extent to which services succeed in working together, it is useful to consider why interprofessional coordination is generally considered a goal worth pursuing. As Corby (2002) has pointed out, communication and coordination can be costly and the outcomes for service users have not been formally evaluated. The benefits need to be enumerated. One clear advantage of interprofessional communication is that the information base for a particular client or family is broadened

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137 Academic labour and the commodification of higher education SEVEN ambiguities and resistance: academic labour and the commodification of higher education Alex Law and Hazel Work Academic workers today are far removed from their ivory tower image. Once eulogised as an other-worldly haven of disinterested intellectual pursuit, free-thought, imagination and scientific breakthroughs, academic labour is becoming increasingly defined by market relations and the managerial conditions under which it operates as paid wage labour. In one sense this is nothing

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Past, Present and Future

This collection charts the key developments in the social work field from 1970 to the present day and shows how by fully understanding social work’s past, we can make better progress for practitioners and service users in the future.

It brings together a broad collection of experts from across social work who trace how thinking and approaches to practice have changed over time, examine key legislative developments in the field, look at the impacts of major inquiries and consider the re-emergence of certain specialisms.

Providing students and practitioners of social work and social policy with a full picture of the evolution of social work, it also shares important insights for its future directions.

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An Ultra-Realist Account of the Service Economy
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As the percentage of people working in the service economy continues to rise, there is a need to examine workplace harm within low-paid, insecure, flexible and short-term forms of ‘affective labour’. This is the first book to discuss harm through an ultra-realist lens and examines the connection between individuals, their working conditions and management culture.

Using data from a long-term ethnographic study of the service economy, it investigates the reorganisation of labour markets and the shift from security to flexibility, a central function of consumer capitalism. It highlights working conditions and organisational practices which employees experience as normal and routine but within which multiple harms occur.

Challenging current thinking within sociology and policy analysis, it reconnects ideology and political economy with workplace studies and uses examples of legal and illegal activity to demonstrate the multiple harms within the service economy.

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After some time of acquaintance with the PAP, social workers often confront me with some questions: why do people in poverty not work? How can their budgetary priorities be changed? What explanation do we have for the difference between those who manage to extricate themselves from poverty and those who do not? What is the difference between providing fish to people in poverty and teaching them to fish? Other people tell me that they are confronted by similar questions when arguing in favour of people in poverty with friends or family. This chapter collects the

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23 TwO politicising social work Functional social work: early 1970s style The 1970s saw increasing attempts to organise social work as a profession. In 1971 there was both the publication of the first issue of Social Work Today, a trade magazine for the profession, and the setting up of the British Association of Social Workers (BASW). The following year saw the inaugural edition of the British Journal of Social Work (BJSW) arguably still, in academic terms at least, the most prestigious of the many social work journals. The BJSW was linked with the newly

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139 eighT politics and social work introduction The ‘radical social work’ movement of the 1970s highlighted the class struggle in British society at the time, and the way in which social work acted in the interests of the ruling class (Bailey and Brake, 1975). In the 1980s, social work embraced other factors such as sexuality, race and gender as areas where oppression occurred, either in association with, or irrespective of, social class (Langan and Lee, 1989). Today, there are also voices calling for social work to awaken from its slumber and recognise

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Lessons for social work internationally

What is the relationship between social work and the state? Who controls which services needs are addressed and how? This important book looks at social work responses in different countries to extreme social, economic and political situations in order to answer these questions. Examples include: war situations, military regimes, earthquakes and Tsunamis. The results show the innovative nature of grass-roots provision and social work intervention and will be of interest to all social work academics, students and professionals.

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573 Policy & Politics vol 35 no 4 • 573–89 (2007) The ethics of welfare-to-work Hartley Dean English This article explores the shifting ethical foundations of the welfare-to-work or ‘workfare’ state within the richer capitalist economies of the world. It provides a discussion of the historical context; a critical analysis of competing moral discourses and ethical concepts of responsibility; and, based on this, a heuristic taxonomy of different approaches to welfare-to-work. It concludes with a critique of the dominant approaches to welfare- to-work

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