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spaces of home. This chapter focuses on ‘spatial belonging’ as it forms in the exteriors of domestic homes for young male migrants who live in Cork, Ireland. The chapter is based on a recent ethnography, Youth-Home, that I conducted with young migrant men on the notion of home. Here, I focus on participants’ significant emotions that are involved in relation to the notion of home in Cork. The chapter first draws on recent literature on emotional geographies of home, before moving on to the methodological approach taken in this study and a presentation and discussion

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conditions. Indeed, the violence is deliberately opaque ‘so that we do not see the violent act or fact, or at least not as violent’ ( Galtung, 1990 : 292). Demonising the ‘undeserving other’ – here, young male migrants – legitimises the violence at play and makes it more difficult to bring attention to it. There is thus an essential need to find ways to identify and render visible such silent forms of violence that are always at risk of remaining unnoticed and normalised by those not affected.

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positioned negatively elsewhere. In Portugal, for example, young, male migrants from Guinea-Bissau are consistently prejudged – by other minority groups, migrants, civil servants and law enforcement officers alike – as somehow connected to the negative issues that their country has become known for, further stigmatising this already-vulnerable group. Although Seku’s involvement in the trade was clear, he openly discussed the stigma that he felt accompanied him in the world. “Our passports are dirty”, he said, feeling that his Guinean nationality and documents worked

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, belonging and success for unaccompanied asylum-seeking children’, Child Abuse Review, 20: 311–23. Lemberg-Pedersen, M. (2015) ‘The rise and fall of the ERPUM pilot: Tracing the European policy drive to deport unaccompanied minors’, Working Paper Series No. 108, Oxford: Refugee Studies Centre. 207 ‘Durable solutions’ when turning 18 Mai, N. (2010) ‘Marginalized young (male) migrants in the European Union: caught between the desire for autonomy and the priorities of social protection’, in J. Kanics, D. Senovilla Hernández and K. Touzenis (eds) Migrating Alone

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need for cash income), stimulated large flows of young male migrants. Fears of theft and a desire to maintain ‘worker discipline’ encouraged the housing of migrants in basic, single- sex compounds. African mine labour was exclusively male, leading to highly gendered patterns of migration, as well as the development of a substantial commercial sex industry around the mines. To a large extent, women, children and older people were left behind in the villages. This led to a geographical pattern of economic and social relations that has persisted ever since

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Migration, Justice and Urban Space

Telling the stories of young refugees in a range of international urban settings, this book explores how newcomers navigate urban spaces and negotiate multiple injustices in their everyday lives.

This innovative edited volume is based on in-depth, qualitative research with young refugees and their perspectives on migration, social relations, and cultural spaces. The chapters give voice to refugee youth from a wide variety of social backgrounds, including insights about their migration experiences, their negotiations of spatial justice and injustice, and the diverse ways in which they use urban space.

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From generalisation to evidence

Over the next 40 years the number of people aged 60+ in the world, many of whom live in developing regions, will grow by 1¼ billion. What will old age be like for them?

This original book provides an analysis of links between development, population ageing and older people, challenging some widely held misconceptions. It highlights the complexity of international experiences and argues that the effects of population ageing on development are influenced by policy choices.

The book will be of interest to a range of academic disciplines, including economics, gerontology, social policy and development studies as well as policy-makers and practitioners concerned with developing countries.

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Male Migrants, Interrupted Journeys and Precarious Lives
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EPDF and EPUB available Open Access under CC-BY-NC-ND

Amid the heavy politicisation and problematisation of male migrants in Europe, this ethnographic study casts new light on their experiences, struggles and everyday resistance.

The author follows the journeys of those who seek, but have little hope of achieving, permanent residence status in European countries, tracking their successive migrations, detentions and deportations within and beyond the continent. She explores migrants’ tactics, the impact of precarity on their lives and the dual feelings of enduring hope and powerless vulnerability they experience.

This is a sensitive and insightful analysis of how the European migration regime shapes, and is shaped by, migrants’ practices.

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Identity, care and justice

Taking a multi-disciplinary perspective, and one grounded in human rights, Unaccompanied young migrants explores in-depth the journeys migrant youths take through the UK legal and care systems.

Arriving with little agency, what becomes of these children as they grow and assume new roles and identities, only to risk losing legal protection as they reach eighteen?

Through international studies and crucially the voices of the young migrants themselves, the book examines the narratives they present and the frameworks of culture and legislation into which they are placed. It challenges existing policy and questions, from a social justice perspective, what the treatment of this group tells us about our systems and the cultural presuppositions on which they depend.

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