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229 Families, Relationships and Societies • vol 5 • no 2 • 229–45 • © Policy Press 2016 • #FRS Print ISSN 2046 7435 • Online ISSN 2046 7443 • http://dx.doi.org/10.1332/204674315X14303090852878 Understanding same-sex marriage as equality, but with exceptions Sara MacBride-Stewart, macbride-stewarts@cardiff.ac.uk and Nicholas Johns, johnsnr@cardiff.ac.uk Cardiff University, UK Alison Green, a.green@glyndwr.ac.uk Glyndwr University, Wrexham, UK Same-sex marriage arguably promotes marriage equality. This article questions public discourses on equality by

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in Bahrain that is heavily influenced – subverted – by its monarchy ( Mabon, 2019b ; Alsarghali, 2020 ). This continuing form of constitutional development suggests, to borrow again from Agamben ( 2005 , 2018 ), that Bahrain is currently operating within a ‘state of exception’. The state of emergency and the state of exception Often conflated, the state of emergency and the state of exception represent two different meanings in this paper. The state of emergency refers to a typical constitutional provision that allows the executive branch to govern with

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Author: David Polizzi

31 3 THE DEvELOPMENTAL HISTORY OF SOLITARY AND SUPERMAX CONFINEMENT: TOWARD A PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE STATE OF EXCEPTION In the previous chapter, a very brief developmental history was provided concerning solitary confinement, which was followed by a brief discussion of the emergence of supermax penitentiaries beginning with the opening of Alcatraz in 1933. In this chapter a more philosophically situated discussion will be offered concerning the ethical implications concerning the structural realities imposed on those individuals placed in such a

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Author: David Polizzi

their ethnic and religious affiliations, a process which is often further clarified by specific localities. Once situated within these localities states of exception emerge identifying targets and nullifying innocence. The focus of this chapter will be to explore the various ways by which a state of exception is evoked within the relational dynamics of terrorism. Though this concept is generally recognized as a set of actions performed by a given state, its process can be similarly located within the relational dynamics of various examples of religious and

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115 SIX The German exception: welfare protectionism instead of retrenchment Werner Eichhorst and Anke Hassel Introduction Since the turn of the millennium, the German model has been characterised by a period of major reforms, followed by a period of remarkable stability and growth in times of global economic crisis. In Germany, austerity-related reforms occurred between 2003 and 2005, when a fundamental restructuring of the welfare system was perceived as necessary to ensure international competitiveness and fiscal sustainability in a situation of high

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Author: Vincenzo Scalia

reflections of Agamben, an attempt to outline a model of coping with pandemics without using the state of exception will be made. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate how the neoliberal hegemony of the last 40 years ( Harvey, 2007 ) has infiltrated common sense to such an extent that even critical thinkers take for granted the role of the State in regulating social relations on behalf of a fully-fledged market economy. This passive acceptance of the ‘state-market match’ is worrying, inasmuch as it not only accepts the restriction of liberties and the extreme

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Author: Didier Fassin

worsening, and in this context, according to Carl Schmitt (2005 [1922]: 5) , the ‘sovereign is the one who decides on the state of exception’. As the diagnosis of crisis signifies a situation of urgency, it logically opens the possibility for governments to declare a state of emergency, which concretely means a suspension of fundamental liberties and rights, including the liberty of movement, of work, of school and of family life, as well as the right to socialise, to protest, to exercise one’s religious faith and to spend the last moments of one’s existence in the

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An Anti-fascist Approach to Artificial Intelligence
Author: Dan McQuillan

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is everywhere, yet it causes damage to society in ways that can’t be fixed. Instead of helping to address our current crises, AI causes divisions that limit people’s life chances, and even suggests fascistic solutions to social problems. This book provides an analysis of AI’s deep learning technology and its political effects and traces the ways that it resonates with contemporary political and social currents, from global austerity to the rise of the far right.

Dan McQuillan calls for us to resist AI as we know it and restructure it by prioritising the common good over algorithmic optimisation. He sets out an anti-fascist approach to AI that replaces exclusions with caring, proposes people’s councils as a way to restructure AI through mutual aid and outlines new mechanisms that would adapt to changing times by supporting collective freedom.

Academically rigorous, yet accessible to a socially engaged readership, this unique book will be of interest to all who wish to challenge the social logic of AI by reasserting the importance of the common good.

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Lived Experiences and Ethical Implications
Author: David Polizzi

Why is solitary confinement used in today’s world? Does it help the rehabilitation of offenders? And how is policy affected by justification for the use of it?

This book is the first to consider the history of solitary confinement and how it is experienced by the individuals undergoing it. Using Merleau-Ponty’s concept of embodied subjectivity, it provides first-hand accounts of the inhumane experience of solitary confinement to provide a better appreciation of the relationship between penal strategy and its effect on human beings. Drawing on his own experiences as a Psychological Specialist in the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections and on those interviewed as part of the Guardian 6x9 project (http://www.theguardian.com/world/ng-interactive/2016/apr/27/6x9-a-virtual-experience-of-solitary-confinement), the author focuses on the phenomenology of solitary confinement to consider what the intentional aspect of this almost uninhabitable type of confinement says about a democratic society that continues to justify its use as a correctional strategy.

Aiming to influence policy, the book fills the gap between the practice of solitary confinement and its implications, as well as the social attitudes that uncritically condone its use.

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Author: Andrew Millie

Philosophical criminology asks big questions about how we get on with one another and what happens when we do not. This accessible book in the New Horizons in Criminology series is the first to foreground this growing area. The book is structured around six philosophical ideas concerning our relations with others: values, morality, aesthetics, order, rules and respect. Building on the author’s theoretical and empirical research, the book considers the boundaries of criminology and the scope for greater exchange between criminology and philosophy. The book is illustrated using examples from a range of countries, and provides a platform for engaging with important topical issues using philosophical and theoretical insights.

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