Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 6,997 items for :

  • labour supply x
Clear All

Introduction Keser et al. (2020: 714) posit the question: ‘Is the labor supply of individuals influenced by their perception of how their income taxes will reflow to them or be wasted in administrative expenditures?’ They examine three separate regimes of tax revenue use: (1) Buchanan’s (1975) ‘Leviathan’, under which no revenue returns back to the taxpayer; (2) public expenditure, consisting exclusively of redistributive transfer payments; and (3) public goods provision, conferring neither direct nor immediate monetary benefits to the taxpayers. In

Restricted access
Author:

algorithms process the locations of delivery workers, restaurants and customers, coordinating them so as to maximise the probability of delivery occurring within the promised time frame ( Seghezzi and Mangiaracina, 2021 ). In food delivery, where consumer demand is less precisely predictable, an on-demand, flexible, quantitatively variable labour supply helps management secure profit generation by cutting labour costs ( Atkinson, 1987 ), which is why delivery workers employed via labour platforms are typically paid per job. Moreover, platforms circumvent stable shifts by

Restricted access

Introduction Labor market economics is about the effectiveness of the market in allocating people’s own time and abilities. The job of the labor market is matching supply and demand. In an ideal economy, supply of labor continuously rearranges itself to meet the demand for labor, moving from one set of skills to another and from one region to another to clear the global labor market. Demand for labor, too, may move across countries and across sectors to search for cheap and appropriate labor. This global process should be driven by prices, in that the price

Restricted access
Author:

35 THREE housing policy: coming in and out of the cold? Brian Lund introduction Unlike health and education and, to a lesser extent, social security and social care, the state never attained a dominant role as a direct housing supplier. Moreover, between 1979 and 1997, state involvement in housing provision was ‘rolled back’ so that New Labour inherited a social housing stock − council housing plus state-supported and regulated housing association property − comprising 23% of total housing supply compared with 32% in 1979. Nonetheless, a ‘residual

Restricted access
Author:

is to elucidate New Labour’s understanding of ‘consumerism’. In so doing it shall draw heavily on Schon and Rein’s concept of the frame. Frames can be understood as analytical devices which supply order and intelligibility to a complex, ever-shifting and confusing world (Schon and Rein, 1994). The first part of the chapter, after a brief sketch of the concept of ‘framing’, consists of a discussion of what will be called New Labour’s ‘diagnostic frame’; that is, the way it defined the problem of ‘modernising’ the public services (for reasons of both space

Restricted access

sufficient to compensate the carer(s) financially as well. To explore this, the study presented here includes not only the monetary transfers that may come (indirectly) from the LTCI, but also any monetary transfers that come from the care recipient’s resources. It is the total amount of compensation that can offer carers some (financial) relief, which could result in a reduction of labour supply. Previous studies have found that carers are more likely than non-carers to both be, or to become, non-employed (see, for example, Pavalko and Henderson, 2006 ; Lee and Tang

Open access
Author:

_news/politics/3733380.stm) Blair listed seven challenges, of which housing was the last and least detailed, continuing a pattern of paying only marginal attention to this important determinant of well-being (Blair, 1998, 2002). However, the theme of this chapter is that in 2004 housing was at the leading edge of welfare reform, and that as such it provides a valuable window on the implications of an opportunity society. Twenty-five years ago, the introduction of the right to buy rapidly privatised a million council houses and led to a steep decline in the supply of accommodation to

Restricted access

30, 1996. The public choice literature on immigration policy is necessarily premised on an analysis of the economic effects of immigration within the destination country. Much of the research by economists on this topic has reached a consensus view that, although immigration may lower the wages of native workers who compete with immigrants for jobs, the rates of return to native- supplied factors that complement immigrant labor are increased and the net welfare effect on the destination economy is positive4. Thus, for example, Borjas [1997] estimates that

Restricted access

performance, London: Sage Publications. 144 Young people and contradictions of inclusion van Lieshout, H. and van Liempt, A.A.G. (2001) Flexicurity: Recent developments in Dutch vocational education and training, Amsterdam: Max Goote Kenniscentrum. Wilthagen, T. (1998) Flexicurity: A new paradigm for labor market policy reform?, Berlin: Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin. Wilthagen, T. (2002) ‘Managing social risks with transitional labour markets’, in H. Mosley, J. O’Reilly and K. Schönmann (eds) Labour markets, gender and institutional change: Essays in honour of Günther Schmid

Restricted access
Author:

phase ends in 2002/03 when Labour first set out its ‘Communities Plan’. The second part picks up where the first left off, focusing on planning reform in the run-up to the 2004 Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act and the Barker Review of Housing Supply (HM Treasury, 2004) and ending with the recent revision of policy guidance dealing with planning for housing (DCLG, 2006). The third section focuses on a particular region – the South East of England – examining the housing growth debate generally and focusing on that component of growth that cannot be

Restricted access