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This part of the book unfolds four points of view regarding the transformational character of the PAP. Similarly to other critical traditions, such as feminisms, the PAP offers a way of seeing the world. Its perspective reveals to us aspects of reality that were previously concealed. Once we adopt this perspective, we cannot avoid seeing power relations, structural injustice and Othering. The first two chapters of Part I , ‘Transformation’, exemplify how this new way of seeing the world changes the ways in which social workers speak and write about service

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131 European Journal of Politics and Gender • vol 1 • no 1–2 • 131–47 © European Conference on Politics and Gender and Bristol University Press 2018 Print ISSN 2515 1088 • Online ISSN 2515 1096 https://doi.org/10.1332/251510818X15272520831111 RESEARCH Misogyny and transformations Suzanne Dovi, sdovi@email.arizona.edu University of Arizona, USA Contemporary politics is marked by both misogyny and transformations. This article offers one way to understand the relationship between these two phenomena, namely, as a double bind. Such an understanding

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What Role for Voluntary Action?

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During the consolidation of the welfare state in the 1940s, and its reshaping in the 2010s, the boundaries between the state, voluntary action, the family and the market were called into question.

This interdisciplinary book explores the impact of these ‘transformational moments’ on the role, position and contribution of voluntary action to social welfare. It considers how different narratives have been constructed, articulated and contested by public, political and voluntary sector actors, making comparisons within and across the 1940s and 2010s.

With a unique analysis of recent and historical material, this important book illuminates contemporary debates about voluntary action and welfare.

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121 FIVE Participatory research: interpretation, representation and transformation Introduction Writing is an everyday communicative practice, which pervades our lives at an individual as well a societal level. Given the omnipresence of the written word, research into the role of written language in everyday communication is at the heart of understanding contemporary forms of social interaction, between institutions and communities as well as between individuals. (Barton and Papen, 2010, p 3) From the perspective of contemporary anthropology, authors such

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PART I Transformations

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negotiate the carbon precipice illustrated in the previous chapter and reach any chance of indefinite sustainability would constitute a complete social transformation. This term is so important to the considerations which follow, and ultimately for any new understanding of realism to which life impels us, that I must set out at this point just what I am taking it to mean. Transformative possibilities A transformation is more than merely a change, even a very significant change. Someone can start acting less selfishly, for example, and if she has hitherto been

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, Institute of Applied Social Studies, University of Birmingham, b.waine@bham.ac.uk Policy Review Transformational government Terry Patterson1 What is the Transformational Government initiative, enabled by information and communications technology (ICT)? We describe its development, origins and prospects in seeking to join up public services to give simple, seamless, one-off access channels for citizens. We look at its governance and working structures, examining how ICT has been used to move towards common infrastructures and approaches in public services, bringing

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Introduction This book argues that the 2010s witnessed the most significant renegotiation of social welfare provision in England since the consolidation of the welfare state in the 1940s. William Beveridge asserted in his landmark 1942 report Social Insurance and Allied Services that ‘a revolutionary moment in the world’s history is a time for revolutions’ ( Beveridge, 1942 : 6). This book considers these two decades, the 2010s and the 1940s, as two transformational moments in which the boundaries between voluntary action, the state, family and the

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65 8 Economic transformation ...difficulties always arise because the city’s economy – perhaps the largest determinant of how and when change occurs – depends on national and international market forces that are beyond the power of the city to influence, thereby making other factors more difficult, complicated, and politically contentious. (Kristina Ford, 2010)1 Economic transformation has defined the fabric of Britain’s towns and cities over three centuries. The nation’s current distinctive regional disparities lie in the economic geography of the 19th

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, 117–18) notes: ‘human activity and work in a degrowth imaginary are centred around care for other humans, sentient beings and their (our) habitats, and they serve the “unproductive” expenditures through which we make meaning’. In essence, degrowth is a form of radical social work as it seeks to critique the growth ideology and implement an array of transformational alternatives within society at large to promote sustainable, social and ecological change. Through a degrowth approach social workers can better achieve ecological justice, without the underlying

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