Poverty, Inequality and Social Justice

The issues involved in poverty, inequality and social justice are many and varied, from basic access to education and healthcare, to the financial crisis and resulting austerity, and now COVID-19. Addressing Goal 1: No Poverty, Goal 5: Gender Equality, Goal 10: Reduced Inequalities and Goal 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions, our list both presents research on these topics and tackles emerging problems. A key series in the area is the SSSP Agendas for Social Justice.

This focus has always been at the heart of our publishing with the view to making the research in this area as visible and accessible as possible in order to maximise its potential impact.

Bristol University Press and Policy Press are signed up to the UN SDG Publishers Compact. In Poverty, inequality and social justice, we aim to address the following goals: 

Poverty, Inequality and Social Justice

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 7,878 items

Through a project undertaken under a programme funded by United Kingdom Research and Innovation (UKRI) called Transforming Education for Sustainable Futures (TESF), alternative learning approaches associated with the introduction of a form of vertical farming called ‘tower gardens’ at primary schools were explored. Methods that were new to the local education context were used to support the learning process, for example role-playing sketches that allowed learners to share their own knowledge about gardening activities with their peers, teachers and staff from the non-governmental organisation that facilitated the process. This collective sharing and recall were key elements of the social learning process, building into individual and group knowledge. Corroborated memory recall contributed to group learning and also built into the collective storage of knowledge. Learning was firmly embedded in social interaction, in collective symbolism and arts – music specifically. These forms of learning and storing of knowledge resonated with the learners as it was a continuation of life as they know it in their community. It became clear from the project that educators saw the value of introducing concepts from classroom subjects when constructing and managing the tower gardens and were pleasantly surprised by the responses of the learners to this new way of learning, suggesting that creating scope within the curriculum and schoolwork plan is necessary in tandem with building the required capacity to replicate this without external support.

Open access

People seeking asylum often have a range of complex social, emotional and economic needs that may be exacerbated by the hostile reception that they often receive. These needs and the stress of navigating asylum systems leave asylum seekers vulnerable to crisis, with refused asylum seekers particularly vulnerable. Even after receiving settled status of some form, barriers to accessing employment or housing and other services remain, as do the impacts of trauma, abuse, and loss sustained in the country of origin, during flight, or during the wait to receive settled status, again leaving refugees vulnerable to crisis. Early action can both have benefits for the individual asylum seeker and reduce the need for costly crisis interventions. This scoping review explores best practice in early action in the voluntary sector, while identifying gaps in the evidence base.

Free access

This chapter situates the book within existing knowledge of intersectionality, and more specifically within knowledge of intersectionality’s operationalization. The latter is discussed in distinct and yet related fields of practice (public policy, social movements and the NGO sector), as well as key ‘issues in practice’ which are particularly relevant to the study of intersectionality in the NGO sector: representation, and coalition and solidarity. The chapter provides a rationale for the research, one motivation for which is that there is debate about what intersectionality is and means among scholars, suggesting that there is no one agreed meaning among practitioners either. Gaps in knowledge are identified, including intersectionality’s operationalization in the NGO sector, in the UK context, and how practitioners themselves understand intersectionality. Key debates within intersectionality studies are utilized to establish the parameters of how intersectionality is employed as a framework throughout the book.

Restricted access

This chapter examines a key issue to understanding and using intersectionality: coalition, within which relationship building and solidarity are also considered. This chapter asks, when applying intersectionality together, what do equality networks do, and how? How do competing concepts of intersectionality circulate, and with what effects for intersectional solidarity and intersectional justice? Barriers to coalition and solidarity are discussed, particularly engrained siloed thinking and attitudes; coalitions at work are examined, through analysis of network engagement on local equality strategies; and challenges and conflicts that emerge are analysed, specifically an example of conflicts about trans rights. The chapter shares lessons in terms of how intersectional political solidarity can be built, and the concepts of intersectionality that it requires; and what some of the limits to this are. The chapter argues that while coalition is a core part of intersectional practice, which concept of intersectionality is employed by both coalitions themselves and participants in them determines how successful they are at building relationships of solidarity to further intersectional justice.

Restricted access
Author:

In the Conclusion we go through the main findings of the book showing the importance of multidimensional approaches to welfare attitude studies, and also the importance of including political and cultural trajectories when analysing welfare attitudes. It is argued that doing so successfully means decentring the European experience and historical trajectories that have served as benchmarks for concepts in welfare attitude studies. The chapter goes on to suggest ways in which we can improve our methodological and theoretical approaches in welfare attitude studies to get more comprehensive understandings of welfare attitudes across countries in the world.

Restricted access

This chapter explores the implications and contributions of the book. Competing concepts of intersectionality serve distinct interests and are thus championed by particular actors; this politics is evident in conflicts about and in the arenas of representation and coalition. The chapter reflects on recommendations arising for policy and practice. While there are few ideal solutions to the problems of intersectionality’s conceptualization and operationalization in siloed policy and practice, from the perspective of thinking through the implications for intersectionally marginalized groups, some compromises and imperfections may be deemed more acceptable than others. Ultimately, the chapter argues that the way that ‘intersectionality’ is mobilized in competing and contradicting ways in policy and practice suggests that, in this context, new, more specific and more transformative concepts are required, and offers some thoughts arising from the research findings on what intersectional practice for intersectional justice might involve.

Restricted access

This chapter analyses the context in which equality NGOs conceptualize and operationalize intersectionality, namely: (i) equality policy and discourse; (ii) austerity; and (iii) the sector’s relationships to the state. Equality organizations’ work is situated within public discourses arising from UK and Scottish equality policy, and the implications of equality policy for intersectionality are analysed. The chapter introduces equality work and discourse as being distinct to the discourse of social ‘inequality’; analyses intersectionality’s take-up, uses and meanings in equality policy documents; and analyses the external barriers that equality organizations face when seeking to operationalize intersectionality. It is argued that in equality policy, there are a range of definitions of intersectionality which thus leaves it underdetermined. Its deployment is largely individualized; merely descriptive; additive; and superficial. Moreover, meaningful engagement with race as a central category of intersectionality theory is lacking in policy. The meanings and uses of intersectionality in equality policy are both influenced by and influence understandings of intersectionality among NGOs. Finally, equality organizations are significantly hampered in their attempts to operationalize intersectionality by the low status they occupy vis-à-vis the state and by neoliberal austerity contexts.

Restricted access
Author:

Chapter 5 explores the importance of cultural value systems when it comes to welfare and welfare attitudes. A key finding is that it is crucial that we do not default to using Confucianism as a catch-all explanation of values in these societies as there is great variation in attitudes and values across them. A focus on a collective, here often represented as the family, and other factors such as ideological socialisation, personal factors and experiences are found to be important when we explore the extent to which cultural aspects can explain who has what welfare attitudes. The chapter shows how attitudes towards gender roles are crucial and important to take into account when analysing welfare attitudes in East Asia as these attitudes shapes views of who should do what and why when it comes to care and welfare provision in the community – key elements in welfare attitudes and deservingness. Much higher percentages than in Western countries see it as the family’s role to care for elderly and children under school age. Furthermore, the role of family in supporting education is important.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter take a deep dive into the importance of the political when it comes to shaping and explaining welfare attitudes in East Asian societies. To do so we set out the trends when it comes to what citizens think should be role and responsibility of government and about the performance of government and then move on to consider what political factors may explain these views. Again, there is no one model across these countries, and political systems and attitudes matter differently depending on society and political system in a society. This is particularly so in mainland China. We also look at the importance of what has been called Asian values and find that, in the societies studied, those citizens who value the importance of obeying a ruler give greater support for redistribution. We find traces of cultural patterns as we uncover negative attitudes towards work being a duty and the view that people who do not work are lazy in all countries, but more so in mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Singapore. However, work being a duty is a shared value across societies. The chapter explores what may explain these trends, comparing what explains welfare attitudes in different political systems.

Restricted access
Author:

Why study welfare attitudes, and why in East Asia? The Introduction to the book sets out what welfare attitudes are, how they are defined and makes the case for why East Asian societies are crucial to study when it comes to welfare attitudes. It also sets out the structure of the book and what to expect as we move along the different dimensions of welfare attitudes.

Restricted access