Collection: Human Rights

 

As a taster of our publishing in Human Rights, we put together a collection of free articles, chapters and Open Access titles. If you are interested in trying out more content from our Global Social Challenges collections, ask your librarian to sign up for a free trial

Human Rights

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 30 items

Author:

This chapter examines changes and constants in North Korean society since the mid-1990s, when the country faced severe famine. In particular, it investigates the rise of the informal market economy – and its subsequent impact on gender roles – and a large exodus of women to China as a consequence of the economic crisis. The chapter situates the North Korean diaspora within the context of globalization and its implications for North Korean refugees and their human rights. It further discusses human rights debates in North Korea and defector human rights activism outside North Korea.

Full Access

The historical evolution of social and legal conceptions of gender based domestic violence in France are the dynamic traces of how social practice, as well as social representations, formed and transformed. However, numerous studies show that the current incident-based conceptions of domestic violence are far from the victims’ experiences, and only partially effective in detecting, criminalising and preventing domestic violence. Understanding the global process by which perpetrators subordinate the victims, mostly women and children, by progressively depriving them of their human rights and liberties, led to a contemporary conceptualisation of domestic violence as coercive control (). Recognising the roots of domestic violence in gender inequality, far from reducing it to some individual, psychological issues, this human-rights based conception of domestic violence is much closer to the victims’ experiences, has led to legal innovation in the ways in which several countries understand, criminalise and prevent domestic violence, and could be at the core of emerging social representations of domestic violence.

Full Access

This book is about the prohibition and the prevention of torture. Its purposes are twofold. The first is to give a frank account of what the UN Subcommittee on Prevention of Torture (SPT) has been able to achieve over the first 15 years of its existence. This also involves being honest about what the SPT has not been able to achieve too, and – more importantly – the reasons for this. The second purpose, and perhaps the more significant, is to expose some of the myths which permit torture to continue to flourish, despite the plethora of international prohibitions that surround it. To that end, the first part of the book considers what, legally speaking, torture is. The background to the Optional Protocol to the UN Convention against Torture (OPCAT) is presented and the practical working of the SPT and how it seeks to prevent torture and ill-treatment is explored. The second part of the book draws on the author’s personal experience and aims to explore the challenges of working preventively, by considering examples of the SPT’s work. This is used to highlight some of the less predictable barriers to effective torture prevention. The book concludes with reflections on what could be done to make torture prevention more effective.

Full Access
Author:

The year 2023 marks 50 years since the era of mass incar-ceration began and there are now more people serving life sentences alone than the entire prison population at its start. This chapter focuses on the proliferation of life imprison-ment as a major, unchecked tactic of mass incarceration and calls for a radical downgrade in the severity of Ameri-can punishment. There have been extensive social, moral, and fiscal costs associated with the large-scale, dec-ades-long investment in mass imprisonment. High levels of imprisonment destabilize entire communities, leading to the dissolution of informal networks that are known to serve as barriers to neighborhood crime. Trust in law enforcement deteriorates as community members experience elevated levels of victimization and the loss of community members, friends, and family members to incarceration. An esteemed group of criminologists writing for the National Academies of Science is only one of the many who have concluded that it is misguided changes in sentencing law and policy, rather than crime, that has accounted for most of the in-crease in correctional supervision.

Open access

This chapter introduces the reader to the study’s theoretical background and proceeds to elaborating upon the set research aims. Hence, this project will first look into the procedural steps that succeeded the irregular entry of unaccompanied children into Greece between the years 2016 and 2020 and examine the processes that they were subjected to. The analysis will then move on to assessing how this study will bring to the surface the reality from within detention facilities for unaccompanied children and focus on whether detention processes place them in the context of crimmigration. Emphasis is gradually added on the study’s aim to explore whether the right to be heard is applied correctly in the minors’ favour during detention. Thus, the applied methodology and core characteristics of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis are discussed. The second part of the chapter is a summary of the book’s structure, coupled with details concerning each chapter’s respective context.

Full Access

RAPAR applies our participatory action research methods to amplify the living experience of families seeking asylum in the UK who are in ‘contingency accommodation’, aka ‘hotels’, and claiming human rights abuses on these sites. From all over the world, these people are without status in the UK and are therefore without recourse to the public funds that are, theoretically, available to everyone living in the UK with status. Their complete legal dependence on the Home Office and its subcontractors to ‘look after’ them and deal with any complaints leads to the question: why would anyone choose to challenge any organisation about human rights violations when that same organisation exercises such profound control over their day to day living reality? The data comprises contemporaneously collected evidence from individual correspondence, questionnaires, semi-structured conversations and case studies with hotel residents. Our preliminary analysis demonstrates considerable failures of statutory bodies in implementing their statutory duties. No evidence of meaningful investigation by any implicated statutory authority, or their privatised sub-contractors, into the human rights violation allegations asserted by hotel residents has been produced. The Local Authorities and the NHS insist that the Home Office is responsible for hotel residents within their boundaries. In turn, the Home Office, including Greater Manchester Police and sub-contractors Serco and Migrant Help, have failed to address the allegations in any transparent way.

We call for immediate action that enables hotel residents to safely protect themselves and stimulates inclusive solution-making, with them, to end these human rights violations.

Full Access

The first chapter sets the context for the rest of the book. It briefly describes the emergence of COVID-19 before moving on to introduce the book’s core premise, that the holistic nature of criminal justice needs to be recognized when considering both the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and how we respond to pandemics in the future. Chapter outlines are also provided.

Full Access

The chapter introduces the volume, sketches the broad outlines of the 16 substantive chapters which follow and sets out the issues and concerns which underpin the approach taken by the collection. The discussion engages, albeit briefly, with the work of a range of Southern and postcolonial commentators who have drawn attention to Southern differences and the postcolonial intersectionalities of race, gender and class. The chapter also introduces the notion of ‘boomerang’ (or ‘blowback’) effects as violence and forms of criminalization and securitization, which were first deployed by imperial nations across their empires, find their way back home and into in the modern governance systems of Northern neoliberal societies. At the same time, processes of transnational governance, even disarmament, peace and human rights initiatives, replicate the many of imperial relations they were meant to ameliorate or replace.

Full Access

This book seeks to examine the complexity of the collision of the pandemics of COVID-19 and racism that become evident when examining the intersection between race, health, public policy and culture. The contributions in this edited collection are an important intervention in speaking back to dominant discourses and the 13 chapters that make up this collection cover a range of facets that have been organised according to key themes that are outlined in this chapter.

Full Access

The Introduction starts with a critical approach towards the ways in which previous research, policy and juridical systems of sexual harassment have constructed this phenomenon as an anomaly and not as an integral effect of social and structural power relations. In the Nordic region, this status as an anomaly is even more prominent due to these countries’ national self-images as utterly democratic, gender-equal and humanitarian societies with robust welfare systems. This chapter presents previous sexual harassment research and the demarcations of this field: its focus on prevalence and close connection with US legislation, its lack of an intersectional approach when it comes to sampling informants, and its simplified relationship to preventive measures and recommendations. Social imagination as a concept is introduced as a way to approach sexual harassment and violence as part of broader contexts of intersecting power relations and to introduce dialogues between sexual harassment research and the broader Nordic field of gender, sexuality and intersectional studies.

Open access