Collection: LGBTQ+ Rights Collection

 

As a taster of our publishing in LGBTQ+ Rights, we put together a collection of free articles, chapters and Open Access titles. If you are interested in trying out more content from our collections, ask your librarian to sign up for a free trial

LGBTQ+ Rights Collection

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The book locates promises of inclusion in a longer trajectory of neoliberal capitalist accumulation, gentrification, and the emergence of an equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) industrial complex which seeks to extract the productive value of differences in pursuit of profit. Bringing together findings emerging from participant observation and open-ended interviews with queer activists and anti-gentrification campaigners, as well ‘career queers’ working in some of the world’s most powerful corporations, the book tells an ethnographic story unfolding across disparate queer worlds in London, offering a situated account of how queerness is currently becoming incorporated into the dominant institutions of capitalist modernity, and what goes into enabling certain inclusive openings for some while closing down others. Using the tension between new openings promised by LGBTQ-friendly corporations and the closure of LGBTQ+ spaces in London as its driving force, the book suggests that neoliberal promises of inclusion engender forms of gentrification – both of queer activism and of queer spaces – that are ultimately at odds with a genuinely transformative vision for queer leftist politics. In so doing the book joins discussions in queer studies, organization studies, urban planning, anthropology and LGBTQ+ studies on the relationship between queerness, identity politics and capitalism. It tries to convince critics of capitalism that following these queer discussions is important and urgent, and attempts to give radical, queer and LGBTQ+ activists the tools to locate opportunities for resistance, co-optation and doing inclusion otherwise in the pursuit of alternative (queer) futures.

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This chapter introduces the Disney Princesses, defining them as a phenomenon and as inherently political. It outlines a new way of analysing the Disney Princesses through facet methodology.

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Queer people face specific issues in the world of science and have unique contributions to make to science communication, so bringing ‘queer’ and ‘science communication’ together in dedicated events, products, and networks is an important part of queer protest, liberation, and visibility. Yet an examination of the science communication research literature reveals that little has been published on the intersection between queerness and science communication over the past thirty years or more.

This introduction provides the foundations of a book on queering science communication. It covers the structure of the book and describes how contributors approached queering science communication in different domains.

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This study explores how LGBTQ parents in Finland account for the role of financial resources in their family-forming process before the child is born or otherwise joins the family. Semi-structured, thematic, face-to-face interviews (n=18) were conducted, audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed with reflexive thematic analysis. The study expands our understanding of financial resources in the family-forming processes of prospective LGBTQ parents and identifies the diversity of the meanings of financial resources experienced by the informants. It can be stated that the role of financial resources appears not only as a concrete need for money to have children but also as a resource that influences decision making and legal aspects during LGBTQ family-forming processes. However, it is not enough to look only at resources; it is equally important to consider the capabilities of individuals. The reconfigurations of family relations were connected to financial decisions and the importance of society’s support in terms of financial resources was essential.

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There is a dearth of research on the dissolution of legally formalised same-sex relationships, which can be partly explained by same-sex marriage and civil partnership being relatively recent possibilities. However, it is also the case that divorce as a topic of research has been marginalised in the renewed interest in family and relationships that has focused on diverse intimacies, family forms, family practices, friendships and personal life. This article analyses data from a qualitative study of same-sex divorce and civil partnership dissolution to consider the reasons that partners give for the ending of their formalised relationships. We argue that our analysis illuminates the need to reinvigorate research on divorce and dissolution more generally to fully understand changing social norms as they concern marriage and similar legal arrangements. We do this by analysing the three main reasons our study participants gave for the dissolution of their relationships: finances, infidelity and wellbeing. Such reasons can be read in part through a gendered lens as previous research has tended to do, but they also go well beyond gender to provide insights into how marriage and relationship ideals, aspirations and practices are being reconfigured contemporarily.

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This chapter outlines a working definition of intersex and highlights its multiple and contested nature with particular reference to a community retreat (The Darlington Statement, 2017), the European Parliament (Promoting the Human Rights of and Eliminating Discrimination against Intersex People (Resolution 2191) 2017) and a consensus statement of leading endocrinologists (Lee et al, 2006). From the outset the chapter highlights the plural approaches taken to defining and constructing intersex. The chapter then outlines the concept of legal embodiment highlighting its material, discursive and institutional nature. The chapter finally summarizes the methods used in the book describing the participants, recruitment method, interview approach and methods of analysis.

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The idea of writing about the lives of older people living with HIV for much or most of their lives would have been unthinkable in the earliest years of the pandemic. Yet we are here now because new technologies allow people living with HIV to live longer and because, as people are sexually active throughout their entire lives, they are being diagnosed in later life. As people live longer, practical and policy support for older persons and their sexual lives will be increasingly important. Authors in this volume also point out that in parts of the world, later life does not refer to being older in years. Experiences of intersectional stigma and oppression are common throughout the world. The introduction concludes by introducing the chapters that make up the volume.

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This rapid review explores research that relates to trans people and social work, with the aim of investigating the experiences of trans people in social work. The article is concerned exclusively with research that platforms the voices of trans people, specifically, those whose input is in direct reference to their experiences in relation to social work. However, the exploration revealed no studies that reference the perspectives of trans social workers. Key recommendations include: the responsible inclusion of trans identities within educational and professional development materials; a visible commitment within social work to confronting transphobia; engaging with practice beyond a binary comprehension of gender; and renewed commitment to person-centred practice that promotes and understands the necessity for self-identification. Additionally, this review restates the need for further ethical research in this area that is more accurately representative and enables the voice and influence of trans people in social work knowledge production.

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