Criminology

Our growing Criminology list takes a critical stance and features boundary-pushing work with innovative, research-led publications.  

A particular focus of the list are books that engage with our global social challenges, both on a local and international level. We aim to publish books in a wide range of formats that will have real impact and shape public discourse. 

Criminology

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 3,547 items

The growth of internet and social media plays an increasing role in the illegal wildlife trade, including the illegal trade in reptiles in the Netherlands. Reptile species are sold on various digital platforms and become victim of this lively online underworld. Reptiles are often laundered online which results in illegal and legal interfaces. This chapter shows how the digital era has enabled traders, buyers, but also illegal entrepreneurs in the reptile business to communicate easily with each other, which complicates law enforcement in the Netherlands.

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Germany is the biggest transshipment and destination country for endangered wildlife in Europe. It has signed all relevant treaties for the protection of wildlife and has dutifully implemented these treaties and EU legislation into national law. Yet, Germany lacks adequate enforcement mechanisms due to the country’s federal system, which fosters decentralization of authority. In some of Germany’s 16 federal states enforcement authority is delegated all the way down to the municipal level. Here, street-level bureaucrats (SLBs) are overwhelmed. Resources, such as training sessions, are spread thin. Moreover, a low caseload as well as frequent job rotation hamper the development of routine and expertise. However, some SLBs overcome these hurdles through the building of networks and other informal means. As the quantitative and qualitative analysis of this chapter demonstrates, Germany’s enforcement of wildlife laws resembles a patchwork of over- and underperforming states and municipalities. Finally, the chapter discusses ways to improve enforcement.

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The UK considers itself to be an animal-loving nation, but it has one of the most nature-depleted landscapes in all of Europe if not the world. To reverse the damaged state of nature, a rewilding movement is gaining momentum around the country. This chapter explores efforts in the UK to rewild the lynx to Scotland and Northern England. The exploration is twofold – first, the chapter examines the narratives of opposition and support for return of the lynx, focusing on the non-human animal and environmental harms and benefits that are predicted. Second, the chapter analyses how the Bern Convention and CITES as they are transposed in UK legislation can account for rewilding.

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Life has become a matter of policy and nature is commodified. Green economy promotes sustainable consumer behaviours, a contemporary oxymoron that hides new forms of consumerism.

To truly be able to allow for non-human animal representation one must reconcile with the fact that we are arrogant parvenues compared to the rest of the natural world, sharing with it genes and finiteness alike, regardless of opposing thumbs and written language.

Non-human animals are asymmetrically caught between advocacy, activism and academia and are the object of a polarized, and perhaps inevitable, anthropocentric cultural and political discourse related to a chronic us vs them or it vs the other position.

In pre-religious and shamanistic cultures, the relationship with the natural world was pragmatic and invested with spiritual significance. Contrariwise, urbanization and ‘modernity’ is connected to a distancing from the natural world, vis-à-vis a dangerous underappreciation of human–nature interdependence, with all that entails.

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The latest assault on Palestine by the Israeli occupation, beginning in early October 2023, marked another instance of colonial violence supported by the West. Through material, ideological and political support, Western political figures, media, intellectuals and civil society organisations have facilitated the decimation of Palestinian society, historically and currently. This intervention argues that Western intellectuals have an important task; to break with this history and collectively engage in crucial solidarity with the Palestinian cause of liberation from Israeli colonial occupation. By connecting and engaging with Palestinian movements and organisations at the forefront of the struggle, Western intellectuals should demand an immediate and permanent ceasefire, call for boycotting, divesting from Israeli universities and Western institutions complicit in the occupation, recognise the illegitimacy of Israeli settler colonialism, and build long-lasting relationships with Palestinian counterpart institutions.

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This article focuses on youth custody and the imprisonment of children. It applies an abolitionist, anti-carceral lens to exploring this injustice. In doing so the article critically explores the imprisonment of children and young people in England and Wales and the institutionalised violence to which these children are subject. It presents a case study of the youth secure estate, using document analysis focused on two recent reports of Werrington Young Offenders Institution, undertaken by the HM Inspectorate of Prisons in 2022. These reports are drawn upon to support the key critical arguments, concerning the imprisonment of children, presented within this article. Such arguments are centred on the failure of the state to afford legitimate safety and protection to children imprisoned in these institutions, and the deplorable role of the state in directly causing and perpetuating a range of harms against children, including ‘cultural, physical and institutionally structured violence’ (: 58). Finally, the article will present a framework for abolitionist alternatives to the imprisonment of children which will ultimately serve to ensure their safety and protection.

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This article examines the theft of migrant workers’ wages in England by their employers, drawing from original accounts and testimonies of a sample of workers employed between 2018 and 2023. It builds on and establishes new conceptual understandings of wage theft by examining it as a violent form of accumulation, with a range of logics and functions including those which are connected to labour processes and the management of labour forces. In making this argument, the article situates the theft of migrant workers’ wages – in this context at least – at the apex of at least three convergent dynamics: namely, the contours of immigration control and attacks on migrants’ rights, a reworking and undermining of regulatory structures relating to labour protections, and ongoing forms of labour market restructuring. As such, it suggests that these dynamics are structural; and furthermore, at a point where each of these policy trajectories is being aggressively pursued, they are intensifying. In dominant narratives wage theft is frequently depicted as something carried out by ‘rogue’ employers, at the margins of labour markets. But in contrast, this article suggests it must be understood as a structurally-situated component of contemporary political economy. Indeed, it is a core contention of the analysis that follows that movements to resist and tackle wage theft must acknowledge these broader connections and the broader political economy of which they are a part.

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Feminists disagree about how best to understand and respond to gendered violence. Disagreements can be due, among other things, to the diversity of feminist perspectives and modes of organisation, different socioeconomic and political contexts, and different conceptions of the state and community. In this article, we explore grassroots feminist discourses on gendered violence in Albania and Kosovo. The two countries have been heavily impacted by gendered violence, but they are also home to a significant grassroots feminist mobilisation. Starting from images and imagination that have characterised this mobilisation, by using the photo-elicitation method, we interview feminist activists and academics about the ways in which they understand and interpret gendered violence, and the strategies and interventions they deem most relevant in addressing it. We offer a contextualised critique of feminist discourses and responses to gendered violence, while highlighting the contradictions and tensions that exist in such discourses and practices.

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The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between surviving gender-based violence (GBV) and the long-term presence of clinical symptoms and psychological distress. This was a cross-sectional study of 105 women, 54 of whom had experienced GBV more than three years prior to the study. Participants ranged in age from 24 to 73 years old. They were assessed using a semi-structured interview, instruments to assess self-esteem, maladjustment, perceived stress, social support and resilience, and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III). Between-group differences and linear regression analyses were used to determine which variables had the greatest impact on the current psychological health status of women survivors of GBV. We found differences in levels of self-esteem, maladjustment, social support and perceived stress. There were also differences in most of the MCMI-III scales, indicating a pattern of depression and paranoid personality. Experiencing GBV in childhood was found to be predictive of increased pathology and emotional distress. Social support has been shown to be a protective factor for anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. GBV should be treated as a distinct form of violence that requires specific treatment, rather than as just another form of interpersonal violence.

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In the context of on-going high rates of domestic abuse in England, the voluntary and community sector increasingly provides specialist domestic violence and abuse (DVA) services to support women in local community settings. This article discusses a qualitative evaluation of one programme, working to support females with mental health needs. A locally based support programme worked with women in one city in England over a two-year period; 34 service users, and eight professionals contributed to interviews and focus groups in support of the evaluation. Our framework analysis identified key themes using survivor voice in respect of the importance of trauma-informed support, adding to the evidence base about effective recovery work in the voluntary and community sector. The defining features of trauma-informed support, safety, trust, choice, collaboration and empowerment were evident in the service model, which led to positive outcomes for survivors who engaged with the programme. The model of provision discussed here is transferrable beyond the voluntary and community sector. Learning from the programme suggests that DVA services can focus on the mental health needs of survivors, using trauma-informed support to enhance recovery.

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