Social and Public Policy

As the leading publisher in Social and Public Policy, we publish in the core social sciences to highlight social issues, advance debate and positively influence policy and practice. 

Our list leads the way on conversations around inequality and social injustice featuring authors such as Peter Townsend, Kayleigh Garthwaite, Danny Dorling, Pete Alcock, John Hills and Bob Jessop. Series including the International Library of Policy Analysis and Research in Comparative and Global Social Policy bring international, high-quality scholarship together in order to address globally shared challenges.

Our key journals in this field are the Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, an internationally unique forum for leading research on the themes of poverty and social justice, Policy & Politics, a world-leading journal that is committed to advancing our understanding of the dynamics of policy making and implementation, and Evidence & Policy, dedicated to comprehensive and critical assessment of the relationship between researchers and the evidence they produce and the concerns of policy makers and practitioners.

Social and Public Policy

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 185 items for :

  • Hunger, Food, Water and Shelter x
Clear All

This chapter considers the impact of race and racism on Black and minority ethnic people involved in social work in Wales. It examines racism and anti-racism in social work education and suggests useful practices in developing anti-racist social work in Wales. The original ideas for this chapter come from the authors’ personal experiences, conversations with other social workers and social work students as well as from relevant literature. Key messages for practice include the need for acceptance that social work values are undermined by racism, therefore there is a requirement for effective anti-racism education and training involving workers, students and people with lived experience.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter explores definitions of coproduction in relation to participation, involvement and expertise through experience, and considers them as they relate to social work practice and education in Wales. It looks at the principles underpinning a coproduction approach which is strengths-based, demonstrating how coproduction principles are enacted within a qualifying social work programme. A specific project is described, as well as an example of learning together, leading us to consider whether there might be a need for creative methods of teaching and learning in order to share power and knowledge. The chapter concludes by looking at barriers and challenges faced and outlines some suggestions for what else needs to be developed to continue the journey towards total partnership approaches.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter highlights what is distinctive about the national and legal context for child and family social work practice in Wales and the nature of the practice. It mentions the study where social workers in Wales reported being the ‘most happy’ in the UK and some of the factors attributed to this satisfaction. These are balanced with findings from a very small sample of parents with less positive feelings following interactions with social workers, and how Welsh experiences are matched with those across the UK. Legal and policy decisions aspire to a more person-centred social work service and a commitment to children’s rights, but current and recent practices have resulted in Wales having the highest rate of children in public care. The chapter unpicks this juxtaposition between the values and principles and the reality of how difficult life is for many children and families in Wales. There are reasons to be optimistic with the aspirational legal framework and the what matters approach and these are explored.

Restricted access
Author:

This chapter identifies community development as a named social work method and response to injustices and interconnected historically located systemic issues, seen for example in inequalities and poverty. It considers contemporary conditions that are heralding the ‘turn of the tide’ for community development in Wales, with implications for social work. It explores what might create an energy to power an incoming tide of community development and social work in Wales, building on the rich and extensive history of community-led community development in Wales. Key messages for practice include the need for social workers to remember historical lessons about the dynamics of institutional power, and its influence on social work’s engagement with socially just informed community development.

Restricted access

In this brief conclusion, the editors reflect on the extent to which the finalised text reflects the ambitions of the book’s starting points. In doing so it highlights how many of the chapters consider Wales having a long-standing commitment to the public sector and a pride in the aspiration of partnership, collaboration, sustainability and radical thinking. It highlights how the collective messages of a definitive ‘Welsh way’ in social work are those of coproduction, lived experience, rights- and strengths-based approaches.

Restricted access

Health and social care, policy and practice has been one of the foremost areas of devolved activity within Wales. As a consequence of this, and particularly since the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, social work practice in Wales has taken on an increasingly distinct existence. This text captures an essential understanding of how the context, delivery and discussions around social work practice within Wales have evolved over the last two decades. It has been increasingly important for academics, researchers and social workers to reflect this Welsh context in their work. For students, the ability to demonstrate an understanding of Welsh context has become a consistent and mandatory core requirement of the Welsh regulator, Social Care Wales, in all pre- and post-qualifying social work programmes and modules. This is the first text that covers these specific elements. Its content is highly original, with its uniqueness emerging through synthesis of the voices of academics, citizens, practitioners and students in an examination of the distinctive nature of contemporary social work in Wales.

Restricted access

This chapter gives a view from a person who uses a variety of public services, outlining how the potentially progressive Welsh legislation enables working in partnership with those who provide education, delivery and evaluation of services. It explains why user participation is undertaken, how this is carried out, what are some of the benefits of such and some current limitations of this flavour of coproduction from the perspective of Welsh users of services. It helps us understand why social work and wider public services in Wales involve those who use services, and to appreciate the importance of service user voice and how barriers between people occur. It also provides a snapshot of the current position of this work and what can be done to improve it.

Restricted access

Health and social care, policy and practice has been one of the foremost areas of devolved activity within Wales. As a consequence of this, and particularly since the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, social work practice in Wales has taken on an increasingly distinct existence. This text captures an essential understanding of how the context, delivery and discussions around social work practice within Wales have evolved over the last two decades. It has been increasingly important for academics, researchers and social workers to reflect this Welsh context in their work. For students, the ability to demonstrate an understanding of Welsh context has become a consistent and mandatory core requirement of the Welsh regulator, Social Care Wales, in all pre- and post-qualifying social work programmes and modules. This is the first text that covers these specific elements. Its content is highly original, with its uniqueness emerging through synthesis of the voices of academics, citizens, practitioners and students in an examination of the distinctive nature of contemporary social work in Wales.

Restricted access

This chapter reflects on the way in which complex organisational processes have defined Welsh social work practice. It explores the resulting loss of freedom of choice and decision-making for social work and social care staff and service users. It proposes another Welsh way built upon core principles of the uniqueness of each person and the skill and insights of social work and social care staff, collaboratively working toward meaningful outcomes. Key messages include identification of the requirement for effective and sustainable implementation through a whole systems approach. This requires systems, processes and structures that are aligned so that they support rather than obstruct practice. It calls for continued change in the culture of supporting social work practice in Wales.

Restricted access

This chapter discusses the work of the ‘Outside In’ project, which seeks to ensure that the voices of individuals and carers are at the heart of social work literature and education. It also demonstrates the variety of ways in which the voices of the people who use services can be heard and emphasises our interconnectedness in communities of learning, as we all carry with us expertise through experience which can be beneficial to others. The chapter presents creative methods of coproduction, such as art and individuals’ stories to help the reader gain an understanding of different perspectives related to social work. It concludes with the idea that nothing is complete until all the partners are equal and that though this project has taken a while, members now feel equal and make a difference, and are valued for their contributions.

Restricted access