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This chapter summarises the material of the book. It revisits some of its core theoretical themes, suggesting that there are openings within the fissures presented by rentier capitalism’s corrosion of community, and its densification of everyday life within dwindling space. The author argues that these openings incorporate alternative strategies of social reproduction that signal a ‘will to become’: a desire for generational reconfiguration borne from the erosion of ‘secure’ pathways to traditional kinship structures.

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This chapter looks at the ways that affective politics circulate within precarious rental accommodation, amidst constricted desires and difficulties in holding boundaries. Moving from a discussion of sexual constriction to feelings of ‘displaced sovereignty’ among respondents who are mistreated by, yet defend, controlling landlord behaviour, the chapter makes connections between capital’s constriction of embodied agency and the suppression of political subjectivity. In the second part of the chapter, the author explores the efforts of queer collective households to realign their homes with desire for social and political transformation, and the tensions and challenges experienced along the way.

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This chapter sets out the substantive content of the book and its broad themes of generational inequality, housing unaffordability and intimate relationships. The chapter includes an account of the author’s personal housing experiences and an overview of their critique of the nuclear family. The author connects the generational disjunctures posed by housing inequality to the diminishing political purchase of the home-owning family, identifying the precarious intimacies of the rented sector as fertile ground for exploring this historical moment in the history of capitalism. There is also a discussion of methods.

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This chapter explores the immaterial, affective and invisibilised labour that renting respondents carried out to replenish their relationships. It first focuses on the affective labour carried out by some social housing residents affected by intergenerational histories of racial capitalism – something the author terms ‘cumulative precarity’. The chapter goes on to explore the precarious relational labour involved in creating a sense of belonging in transient, privately rented homes, looking at relationships to home improvement and outdoor space.

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This chapter draws out the politics of renting respondents’ reproductive imaginaries, and how they speak to the different lives that can be made and remade amidst precarity. The chapter explores the assumed dependentlessness embedded in the transient temporalities and dense spaces of London renting, and examines the ways that both social and private tenants’ access to social reproduction is eroded by the formulation of housing as either investment or consumption. The final section of this chapter shifts focus from the reproduction of families to the reproduction of romantic relationships.

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Generation, Rent and Reproducing Relationships in London

In a time of increasing social and economic inequality, this book illustrates the precarity experienced by millennials facing both rising rents and wage stagnation. Featuring the voices of those with lived experience of precarity in north-east London, MacNeil Taylor focuses on intimacy, reproduction and emotional labour.

The book widens readers’ understanding of a middle-class ‘generation rent’ beyond those locked out of anticipated home ownership by considering both social and private renters. Situated in a feminist and queer theoretical framework, the book reveals the crucial role of British policy-making on housing, welfare, and immigration on deepening inter- and intra-generational inequality.

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This chapter provides a conceptual overview of the theoretical literature and research on precarity, intimacy and reproduction. It unites these concepts to formulate a theory of precarious intimacy as the ‘place between difficulty and desire’ in insecure rented accommodation. This chapter also offers a geo-historical account of the assetisation of housing in Britain and specifically in London, with emphasis on the imperialist politics undergirding this process.

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Addressing what queer conflict studies research looks like is the key work of this book. Envisioning a future for queer conflict studies that complicates and even transforms how conflict research is performed, what it examines, and what it means, the authors across this volume consider seriously the theory and practice of ‘queer conflict research’—particularly exploring ‘new approaches to the study of political violence’. These ‘new approaches’ consider how methods and methodology can be queered, and what that means for conversations between queer conflict research, feminist security studies, queer international relations, and critical work in security and transitional justice. It does so in three parts dealing with different dimensions of queer conflict research: queer approaches to conflict research, queer methods in the practice of conflict research, and addressing queer experiences of conflict research. Across these parts, this book provides key insights into what it looks like to do queer research in conflict studies, and what queer conflict research’s political and epistemological commitments might be. This conclusion looks at lessons learned across the book, and makes some observations about potential futures for queer conflict research.

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Research on the impacts of conflict and displacement on persons of diverse sexual orientations, gender identities, and expressions and sex characteristics (SOGIESC) has grown over the course of the past years, and the Syrian Civil War has been one of the main case studies that has been studied in this respect. Alongside academic research, local and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have played a key role in this, and all four of us authors have been involved closely with these processes. In an informal dialogue, we explore here some of the benefits and drawbacks, some of the achievements and frustrations of conducting this research with diverse SOGIESC people in Lebanon, Syria, and Turkey, as well as reflecting on doing advocacy and trying to make research meaningful to our research participants.

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As a queer, Muslim, Afghan asylum seeker, I was hesitant to return to my own community of Afghans and conduct an ethnographic study of their displacement journeys from Afghanistan and subsequent lives in exile in the US. Prior to embarking on my fieldwork, I asked myself: will they accept me as I am or do I have to hide parts of me? Will I be disrupting ethical terrains of research if I rely on secrecy? Once in the field, I came to realize that to some Afghans I was a piece of home; a displaced person, under state scrutiny just like them. To some, I reminded them of their cousin. They wanted to share a few cups of tea, flavoured with nostalgia for home. To others, my queer self was seen as a transgressor of Afghanness, failed at life and doomed in the afterlife, as they would say. How are identities and experiences of a researcher entangled with those of the researched? How do attachments to home and experiences of war and displacements trouble the ethical terrains in the field? This chapter explores these questions while advancing a diasporic feminist queer ethics of care.

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