Sociology > Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,484 items

Author:

This article discusses the various affective and emotional dimensions of how racialised individuals understand and cope with the ambiguous question of ‘Where are you (really) from?’ Theoretically, the article argues that people do not necessarily ‘comprehend’ racism but sense it, and that it is through affects and being affected that they understand the nature of an encounter. Empirically, the article is based on 21 in-depth interviews conducted with Black Germans, and it analyses respondents’ reflections on and ‘emotion memories’ of being asked the question of ‘Where are you from?’ Only a few respondents said that they had consciously decided to always regard the question as ‘normal’ and thus to ‘switch off their sensitivity’. Overall, when asked this question, interviewees relied on ‘affective thinking-feeling’ to determine whether there was racism to be sensed. By analysing respondents’ narratives of particular episodes in which they were asked the question, the article proposes that a specific assemblage and affective intensities are the main conditions for immediately sensing racism in and through the question. In addition, the article discusses interviewees’ range of response options and why and when respondents may engage in ‘emotion work’ when responding to the question. The article concludes by highlighting different types of emotions associated with sensing racism through the question, particularly the emotions of unease, discomfort, and disappointment that can lead to feelings of non-belonging.

Restricted access

Cultural hierarchies enable an understanding of how consumption takes part in the reproduction of social inequalities in current societies. The changing nature of these hierarchies reveals a tension between established and emerging forms of cultural capital. This article explores this tension in the context of an understudied European cultural semi-periphery country. It focuses on young university students in a social milieu where new trends, established legitimate culture and cosmopolitan cultural flows intersect. The article uses a mixed-method approach and analyses cultural space both through survey data and follow-up in-depth interviews. Detailed exploration of cultural repertoires shows that while survey analysis shows both established and emerging forms of legitimate culture, there is widespread deference among the students towards the former. While cultural goods associated with emerging cultural capital are widely consumed, they are not related to repertoires of legitimisation. This points to the continuing importance of national institutions and their pedagogical practices in delineating what is understood as legitimate culture.

Restricted access
Author:

This article explores the use of online social networks for seeking and sharing information about marriage migration. In Europe, since the 1990s, this migration has faced heightened scrutiny. Laws and administrative practices have added complexity to immigration procedures. Manifold screening methods gauge the authenticity of relationships aligning with the host nation’s concept of a suitable family for integration. In this context, informal self-help groups emerged to offer support to those facing burdensome formalities and local administrative intricacies. Based on extensive qualitative fieldwork, this article examines the significance of these support groups, drawing on the concept of intimacy as a shared competency. Here, intimacy is conceived as an active relational skill that counterbalances the limitations of migration policies. The analysis transcends the division between online and offline modes of living, shedding new light on intimacy and extimité – the sharing of one’s intimate self with others for validation – in doing family.

Restricted access

This article contributes to the sociological debate on how digital technologies (DT) have penetrated the lives of families and children, and examines the relevance of digital technologies for children and for practices of ‘doing family’. We analysed qualitative data from focus groups and interviews with children between 5 and 10 years old (n=231) and interviews with further members of children’s families from four different European countries (Austria, Estonia, Norway and Romania). Results reveal that DT contributed to doing family when families created and maintained a feeling of ‘we-ness’ through digital activities; when DT required families to balance different needs, rights, or emotions; and when caring practices were supported through DT. Children appeared as significant actors in practices of doing family. As DT helped to decouple practices of doing family from physical co-presence, doing family was expanded. When children’s needs were fulfilled and their digital competences were enhanced, their resilience increased.

Restricted access

Due to changes in family planning policy, families with multiple children are re-emerging in China. This article looked at parental stress and parenting practices in Chinese families with one child, two children and three children, and explored to what extent, controlling for socioeconomic factors, the number of children and parenting practices influenced parental stress. Using a sample from southern China, we measured parental stress and parenting practices among parents who have at least one child in primary school. Results showed that having multiple children increased parental pressure, and this was partially caused by a change in parenting practices: compared with their counterparts with only one child, parents with multiple children tended to use less positive encouragement but more coercive parenting. Findings suggested that in the context of low fertility, ‘parenting’ is more important than ‘fertility’. Effective parenting practices help reduce pressure, which in turn reduce a family’s fear of childbearing.

Restricted access

The emergent practice of sharing textual and audiovisual content concerning underage children online by their parents or guardians, also known as ‘sharenting’, is part of emerging digital cultures, which are enabled by affordances provided by new media technologies. Based on data from a passive virtual ethnography of Facebook communities, this article analyses the sharenting practices of parents involved in judicial litigations. While contributing to wider debates on doing and displaying family and controversial sharenting activities, the results of this article show how sharenting is addressed in online communities by administrators and other users; how the privacy vs openness paradox about sharing information and content concerning children’s involvement in judicial litigations is negotiated by parents and administrators; and how online and offline parenting cultures affect sharenting as a practice.

Restricted access

Digital technologies play an increasing role in intimate couple relationships, prompting new approaches to better understand the contemporary digital relationship landscape. This article uses feminist new materialist assemblage thinking to explore the functioning and processes of a relationship support app, Paired. Deploying diffractive analysis, it presents three composite narratives that explore the temporality of couple relationships, relationship work and situated practices of coupledom. Composite narratives retain the emotional truth of original accounts through combined participant voices, enabling attention to be focused on the user–relationship–app assemblage. Findings suggest that routinised app notifications prompt meaningful everyday relationship maintenance behaviours. Human–technology intra-actions thus generate positive relationship health and wellbeing behaviours which may have lasting benefits. This article’s contributions are therefore largely methodological and conceptual, with analysis of supplementary primary interview data (n=20) derived from a mixed-methods evaluation, including brief longitudinal surveys over three months (n=440) and a detailed survey (n=745).

Open access

There has been a growing interest in the connection between consumption and health, particularly in relation to consumerism in healthcare services and consumption’s impact on population health. Initially the idea of the ‘healthcare consumer’ was met with extreme scepticism, as it was argued that this idea was a misnomer and that the concept was threatening to fragment healthcare. Yet more recent empirical work into consumption practices and health has shown that the relationship is much more nuanced than previously thought. This article takes the case of daily care for oral devices and seeks to further unpack the relationship between consumption and health. The results are based on analysis of data collected in 2019 from the Philippines and Russia. The analysis focuses on how adjustments are made to the relationships between the body, consciousness and everyday life when living with oral devices (dentures, aligners and mouthguards). It examines the daily practices associated with care for such devices, examining the spaces, materials and practices involved in daily oral care. The findings demonstrate that in Russia and the Philippines several ‘bundles’ of consumption practices exist, reflecting quite different teleoaffective structures for consumption practices. The study also uncovers the ‘distributed agency’ of oral devices examining how they shape daily life.

Open access