Policy & Politics
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Citizen participation and changing governance: cases of devolution in England

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Brenton ProsserUniversity of Sheffield, UK/ Australian National University, Australia

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Alan RenwickUniversity College London, UK

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Arianna GiovanniniDe Montfort University, UK

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Mark SandfordHouse of Commons, UK

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Matthew FlindersUniversity of Sheffield, UK

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Will JenningsUniversity of Southampton, UK

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Graham SmithUniversity of Westminster, UK

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Paolo SpadaUniversity of Coimbra, Portugal

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Gerry StokerUniversity of Southampton, UK/ University of Canberra, Australia

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Katie GhoseElectoral Reform Society, UK

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The current process of devolving powers within England constitutes a significant change of governance arrangements. This process of devolution has been widely criticised for including insufficient consultation. This paper assesses whether that criticism is fair. Modifying Archon Fung’s framework for the analysis of public participation mechanisms, we begin by considering whether the depth of public engagement has been limited. Then, by comparing these consultation practices with other examples (including one we have ourselves trialled in pilot experiments), we find that deeper forms of public engagement would have been both possible (though at some financial cost) and productive.

Brenton ProsserUniversity of Sheffield, UK/ Australian National University, Australia

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Alan RenwickUniversity College London, UK

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Arianna GiovanniniDe Montfort University, UK

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Mark SandfordHouse of Commons, UK

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Matthew FlindersUniversity of Sheffield, UK

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Will JenningsUniversity of Southampton, UK

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Graham SmithUniversity of Westminster, UK

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Paolo SpadaUniversity of Coimbra, Portugal

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Gerry StokerUniversity of Southampton, UK/ University of Canberra, Australia

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Katie GhoseElectoral Reform Society, UK

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